All posts in Hindu Epic Stories

Story when before dying Duryodhana instructs Ashwatthama, Kripacharya, and Kritvarma to take revenge with the Pandavas

When the coast is clear, Ashwatthama, Kripacharya, and Kritvarma, having witnessed the fight and not wanting to interrupt so as to rob Duryodhana of his honour, come to Duryodhana’s broken body. Duryodhana commands them to take revenge on the Pandavas, and to specifically kill all the Pandava brothers and Panchalas. Using the blood from his body, Duryodhana appoints Ashwatthama as the army’s supreme commander and the protector of his wealth, country, family, and honor. Already angry at the deceitful killing of his father Drona, Ashwatthama ambushes the Pandava camp at night. The three maharathis lay waste to the sleeping, drunk, and unaware army. Other than those who had been staying in the Kaurava camp, few escape the slaughter. The trio rushes to tell Duryodhana of the news. After destroying the entire Pandava camp, Ashwatthama proceeds towards Duryodana with the cut-off heads of the Upapandavas. He told Duryodhana that he only managed to kill the Pandava’s children as the Pandavas were not there, and this makes Duryodhana happy, as that means the Pandava lineage would die out. Duryodhana then, having heard the news that was so agreeable to his heart, regained his senses and praised Ashwatthama for achieving what Bhishma, Drona, and Karna had failed to accomplish. Duryodhana died happily with a smile in his face.

Story when Ulupi or Uloopi falls in love with Arjuna

Arjuna is exiled from Indraprastha to go on a one-year pilgrimage as a penance for violating the terms of his marriage to Draupadi, the brothers’ common wife. Accompanied by Brahmins, Arjuna goes to north-eastern region of present-day India. One day when he bathes in the Ganga river to perform his rituals, the current pulls him inside the river. He later realises that it was Ulupi, the Naga princess, who “grasped” and pulled him into the river. She held him with her hands and traveled at her will. They finally ended up in an underwater kingdom, the abode of Kourvaya. Arjuna saw a sacrificial fire in the place and offered his rites in the fire. Agni was pleased with Arjuna’s “unhesitating offering of oblations”. Delighted by her act, Arjuna inquires Ulupi about her background. She reveals her lineage and admits that she had fallen in love with him.

Story when Arjuna initially hesitant finally marries to Ulupi or Uloopi

Arjuna declines Ulupi or Uloopi’s proposal for marriage citing his celibacy on his pilgrimage. Ulupi argues that his celibacy is limited only to Draupadi, Arjuna’s first wife. Convinced by her argument, he marries her and spends a night with her. A son named Iravan was born to them. Pleased by Arjuna, Ulupi grants him a boon that all animals that live under water will obey him and he will be invincible under the water.

Story of Arjuna and his association with Ulupi, Babruvahana and Chitrangada

The Vasus, Bhishma’s brothers, cursed Arjuna after he killed Bhishma through treachery in the Kurukshetra War. When Ulupi heard of the curse, she sought the help of her father, Kouravya. Her father went to Ganga, Bhishma’s mother, and requested her for a relief from the curse. Upon hearing him, Ganga said that Arjuna would be killed by his own son, Babruvahana—Arjuna’s son through Chitrangada—and brought back to life when Ulupi places a gem on his chest. Following her father’s advice, Ulupi instigates Babruvahana to fight Arjuna. When Arjuna goes to Manipur with the horse intended for the Aswamedha sacrifice, the king Babruvahana, as directed by Ulupi, challenges Arjuna for a duel. In the fierce battle that took place between them, both are mangled by the other’s arrows. Finally, Arjuna is mortally wounded and is killed by his son when he shoots a powerful arrow at him. Chitrangada rushes to the spot and abuses Ulupi for instigating Babruvahana to fight Arjuna. Repenting of his deed, Babruvahana is determined to kill himself, but is promptly stopped by Ulupi. She goes to her kingdom and brings the gem. When she places the gem on Arjuna’s chest, his life is restored, thus relieving him of the Vasus’ curse. When brought back to his life, Arjuna becomes happy to see Ulupi, Chitrangada, and Babruvahana. He takes all of them to Hastinapur. Upon the onset of the Kali Yuga, the Pandavas along with Draupadi retired and left the throne to their only heir Arjuna’s grandson, Parikshit. Giving up all their belongings and ties, they made their final journey of pilgrimage to the Himalayas, accompanied by a dog. Ulupi went back to her kingdom in the Ganga river.

Story of Sage Sanatkumara

Sage Sanatkumara was one of the Four Kumaras, the four Manasputras (mind-born-sons) or spiritual sons of Brahma according to Puranic texts of Hinduism, including the Bhagavata Purana, whose other sons were Sanaka, Sanatana, and Sanandana. Sanatkumara in Sanskrit means “eternal youth”. Though in Mahabharata, total seven sons are mentioned and further mentions that, “Knowledge comes to these seven rishis, of itself (without being dependent on study or exertion). These seven are wedded to the religion of Nivritti (inward contemplation). They are the foremost of all persons conversant with Yoga. They are possessed also of deep knowledge of the Sankhya philosophy. They are preceptors of the scriptures on duty and it is they that introduce the duties of the religion of Nivritti (inward contemplation), and cause them to flow in the worlds”.

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