All posts in Stories of Babruvahana in Mahabharata

Story of Ulupi or Uloopi in Mahabharata and her association with Arjuna

Ulupi or Uloopi is a character in the Hindu epic Mahabharata. The daughter of Kouravya, the king of serpents, she was the second among the four wives of Arjuna. Ulupi is said to have met and married Arjuna when he was in exile; she had a son with him, Iravan. She played a major part in the upbringing of Babruvahana, Arjuna’s son with Chitrangada. She is also credited with redeeming Arjuna from the curse of the Vasus by restoring his life after he was slain in a battle by Babruvahana. Little is said about Ulupi in the Mahabharata. Ulupi is known by numerous names in the Mahabharata.

Story of Arjuna and his association with Ulupi, Babruvahana and Chitrangada

The Vasus, Bhishma’s brothers, cursed Arjuna after he killed Bhishma through treachery in the Kurukshetra War. When Ulupi heard of the curse, she sought the help of her father, Kouravya. Her father went to Ganga, Bhishma’s mother, and requested her for a relief from the curse. Upon hearing him, Ganga said that Arjuna would be killed by his own son, Babruvahana—Arjuna’s son through Chitrangada—and brought back to life when Ulupi places a gem on his chest. Following her father’s advice, Ulupi instigates Babruvahana to fight Arjuna. When Arjuna goes to Manipur with the horse intended for the Aswamedha sacrifice, the king Babruvahana, as directed by Ulupi, challenges Arjuna for a duel. In the fierce battle that took place between them, both are mangled by the other’s arrows. Finally, Arjuna is mortally wounded and is killed by his son when he shoots a powerful arrow at him. Chitrangada rushes to the spot and abuses Ulupi for instigating Babruvahana to fight Arjuna. Repenting of his deed, Babruvahana is determined to kill himself, but is promptly stopped by Ulupi. She goes to her kingdom and brings the gem. When she places the gem on Arjuna’s chest, his life is restored, thus relieving him of the Vasus’ curse. When brought back to his life, Arjuna becomes happy to see Ulupi, Chitrangada, and Babruvahana. He takes all of them to Hastinapur. Upon the onset of the Kali Yuga, the Pandavas along with Draupadi retired and left the throne to their only heir Arjuna’s grandson, Parikshit. Giving up all their belongings and ties, they made their final journey of pilgrimage to the Himalayas, accompanied by a dog. Ulupi went back to her kingdom in the Ganga river.

Story when Arjuna married Chitrangada on a condition

Chitrangada, in the Hindu epic Mahabharata, is one of Arjuna’s wives. Arjuna travelled the length and breadth of India during his term of exile. His wanderings took him to ancient Manipur, an almost mystic kingdom renowned for its natural beauty. There, he met Chitrangada, the daughter of the king of Manipur, and moved to her father Chitrabahana to seek her hand in marriage. Her father demurred on the plea that, according to the customs of his people, the children born of Chitrangada would be heirs to Manipur and he could not allow his heirs to be taken away from Manipur. Arjuna agreed to the stipulation that he would take away neither his wife Chitrangada nor any children born by her from Manipur and wed the princess on these premises. A son, whom they named Babruvahana, was born to them.

Story when Babruvahana killed his father Arjuna and Karna’s son Vrishtaketu in Mahabharata

When Arjuna went to Manipur with the horse intended for the Aswamedha, Babruvahana captures the horse which means war the pandavas. Arjuna tries to persuade Babruvahana to leave the horse as there was no enmity between Manipur and Pandavas. Babruvanahana agrees with Arjuna and informs he wishes to defeat Arjuna for his Guru Dakshina. Arjuna, reluctant to fight a young boy, leaves and informs a small troop of his army to convince Babruvahana to give the horse back. Babruvahana defeats the army. He also defeats Bhimsena, Arjuna’s elder brother, and kills Karna’s only surviving son Vrishtaketu. Arjuna takes an oath to kill him or immolate himself if he is defeated by Babruvahana, to avenge Vrishtaketu’s death. Arjuna loved Vrishtaketu more than he loved his own son. King Babhruvahana (who is an avatar of Prabhasa) kills his father Arjuna with an arrow, a Boon given to him from Ganga, Bhisma’s mother. Repenting of his deed after knowing Arjuna’s identity, he determined to kill himself, but he obtained from his stepmother, the Naga princess Uloopi, a gem called Nagmani which restored Arjuna to life with the help of Krishna. Arjuna repents he won’t be able to be able to live even when revived by Krishna, thinking Vrishtaketu, his elder brother Karna’s son got killed because he sent Vrishtaketu to fight with Babruvahana. Krishna’s informs that he will restore Vrishtaketu’s life. After Vrishtaketu is revived by Krishna, Babruvahana asks Vrishtaketu to forgive him (which he does). Vrishtaketu applaudes Babruvahana of being an amazing warrior. Everyone return to Hastinapura including Vrishtaketu, Chitrangada, Babruvana and Ulupi.

Story when Arjuna did not recognise & accept Babruvahana as his son

Babruvahana or Babhruvahana is a character in the Mahabharata. He is one of the sons of Arjuna, begotten through Chitrangada. Arjuna leaves Chitrangada due to a treacherous plot by Arjun’s wife Ulupi from the Naga Clan. Ulupi was envious of Arjuna’s marriage to Chitrangada. Arjuna leaves Chitrangada after questioning her chastity when Babruvahana was in her womb. Babruvahana was adopted as the son of his maternal grandfather and as his successor. Once he came to know Arjuna was his father, and when he came to see his father, Arjuna did not recognise him and said he was a wanderer.

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